Ipsos Corporate Reputation

The Spread of Techlash

How can businesses respond to the reputational challenges of technological change – including privacy, data leaks, advertising practices, and AI
and automation?

Technological backlash doesn’t just affect tech companies; a majority of Reputation Council members across all sectors say that tech issues, particularly around the use of personal data, have become more important to them.
There are three key areas that communicators need to watch out for to protect companies’ reputations: data security, new international regulations and standards, and fake news.
Techlash is no different to the reputational challenges that many other sectors have faced in the past, and traditional communications techniques – understanding different stakeholder perceptions, message testing, horizon scanning, and crisis preparedness – are key to tackling the threat.

If you’re not worried about the impact of techlash on your company, perhaps you should be.

Techlash was defined by the Financial Times as ‘the growing public animosity towards large Silicon Valley platform technology companies and their Chinese equivalents’ when it chose the term as one of the defining words of 2018.

But technology issues are increasingly shaping the reputations of businesses in every sector.

Our own Ipsos research shows that these concerns are key issues for stakeholders, particularly around data privacy, where lack of understanding means groups as diverse as media, consumers and government make assumptions about how their data is being used and misused by companies in practices that aren’t explained.

WHICH, IF ANY, OF THE FOLLOWING ISSUES DO YOU THINK HAVE BECOME MORE IMPORTANT SINCE TECHLASH STARTED?

Council members have plenty of advice for preparing for these issues, but Ipsos says: keep ahead of what stakeholders know (or think they know) about your company.

In 2018, tech companies came under scrutiny again – this time, not because Apple was claimed to be funnelling profits through Dublin, or Samsung phones were exploding, but for reasons much more closely tied to their core business: data use and misuse by tech firms and third parties, ‘fake news’, and the threat of hackers.

of Council members expect data and privacy issues to affect their own companies.

But these issues don’t just affect tech companies any more. Three quarters of Council members say that transparency around data collection and usage has become more important to them since techlash started, and more than half are concerned about ‘fake news’.

The vast majority (86%) of Council members expect these issues to affect their own companies – and those who don’t either don’t require personal data for their business model or are confident that they have prepared enough already to avoid being affected.

There are three particular areas that Council members mentioned when we asked why they expected techlash to affect them.

All companies are data companies now

There are few companies in the world which don’t collect data as part of doing business, whether that’s consumer, supplier or client information. As one Council member put it, “companies will become just as much data companies as they are health companies.” The smart dashboard in your car means that companies like Nissan or General Motors hold much more data on customers than even 20 years ago. Supermarkets can email you when your favourite brand of toilet paper is back in stock.

The more data is collected, the more stakeholders want to know what exactly the company is doing with the data. In the era of smartphones, many of the data connections are transparent but baffling – why does your new gaming app need access to your Facebook data? For some companies, data security is nothing new.

Council members in the banking sector claim that they are ahead of the curve, having had stringent data protection mechanisms in place since before the World Wide Web. Being early adopters has paid off: Ipsos Global Trends data from 2016 shows that more people trust banks with their data than any other type of business. For other companies, it will mean a change in how they think about themselves.

No matter where you work, working in corporate communications means you may soon face questions about what data your company collects and how it is shared and used.

"The big challenge is that the digital world is based on data, while our company is not used to dealing with data. We need to develop competencies and expertise in data management and privacy. Developing new competencies is always a big challenge."
"We will have to review and follow the legislation on private data that has just arrived in Europe. It is necessary to discipline the company, establish rules and criteria to respect these laws. So the impact on the company is difficult, but it does not endanger the life of the company, we just have to adapt the organisation."
Europe regulates the world

2018 was the year that the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) took force – and you could hardly avoid it. Certainly, our Council members around the world felt its force. Communicators working in Europe mention the steps their companies took to become compliant – but in our interconnected world, what happens in Europe has ramifications much further afield. Some Council members from outside the EU say that they have taken GDPR as their starting point, both for dealing with European stakeholders (a legal requirement) and for assumptions about how data protection standards might be rolled out across the world in the future.

We know from our wider research that the general public in the UK are more clued up on GDPR than you might expect.

Its adoption has not yet started to make an impact on how much the public trust the organisations and industry sectors that use our data most frequently and on the largest scale. But communications leaders should expect a more knowledgeable public to ask more questions in the future.

Fake News

The word of the year from 2017 shows no signs of going away in 2019. Communicators must still watch out for the implications of fake news scandals. They can happen in public places (the new town halls of Facebook and Twitter) or in private groups (encrypted services like WhatsApp), and each location requires a radically different response from communicators.

"Nowadays, on social networks, people often build their own fictional world, pretending to do wonderful things that they do not actually do. Conversely, [we have] real incredible stories to tell and, paradoxically, find it difficult to prove that such stories are true."

Council members talk about two of the main threats from fake news.

Lies about their companies can spread like wildfire, and corporate rebuttals don’t have the same virality as the initial stories. One Council member states:

"Power is actually in everyone’s hands. Today a fake news [story], if well crafted, does not have to be made by a large vehicle, and it has a greater destructive potential than anything else."
"You have to understand how you can use this digital world in a healthier way by letting people know that your [communications] are not fake news, they are not untruths. When I run a campaign, I have to have a certain credibility."

All companies have good stories they want to tell, but some Council members fear that the pervading atmosphere of distrust means the public won’t believe them.

We have to remember that cultural context is a force at play here. Massive closed groups, through which false stories can spread, are much more prevalent in developing markets than in developed economies. And Ipsos research in 27 countries shows that the crisis of trust in traditional media sources is more overblown than we might think: it is a problem in established markets, true, but developing markets report an increase in trust in professional media outlets. Whatever your target audience, it’s important to find out where they get their news, and what credibility they put in individual publications – including your company communications.

"Our company must think and operate as if observers were always present, and perfection must be the goal: if consumers observed what we do, they would say that it is perfect. Nobody is perfect, but we strive for continuous improvement."
"At some point people will understand and say: okay, it’s not just in social networks, it’s how companies are using my data, and this will affect other sectors."

Final thoughts

Despite the different forms that technological backlash can take, Council members advise four key ways to keep on top of the story.

The fundamentals of communications haven’t changed. Be clear and transparent, and communicate openly and honestly. Much of the tech-related suspicion facing corporates at the moment stems from a lack of understanding among the public – something that doesn’t just affect technology companies, but all companies which use personal data.

Get ahead of the story. Council members perceive that many tech companies are playing catch up, reacting to stories as they explode, rather than defusing them before they begin. For all companies, regular horizon scanning can help you keep track of issues as they start to emerge. Many of our research programmes among senior publics take this long-term approach, helping our clients understand where they might be in five years’ time as well as what needs to be fixed right now.

Be more joined up. Members observe that changes and uncertainty in the policy or public environment don’t affect any company in isolation. Over the years that we’ve been conducting reputation research for some of the biggest companies in the world, we’ve seen that, rightly or wrongly, sector reputations often rise and fall as one. Even audiences that you hope know better, like senior legislators, often get confused about whether a story they heard involved company A or company B. It’s important to know what issues ‘belong’ to a sector and what ‘belong’ to individual companies from the external perspective. There are areas in all sectors where a united approach can make a bigger difference than individual efforts, even for some of the largest companies in the world.

This is part of growing up. Many Council members are sanguine about the challenges that the tech sector is facing at the moment because they’ve been through it themselves. They view it as a sign of a maturing sector. Perceptions of the tech sector will settle, but it is important for businesses to communicate their viewpoint so that this settlement doesn’t happen without their involvement and isn’t to their detriment.

Methodology: 154 interviews conducted with Reputation Council members between 25th June and 12th November 2018.

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The Reputation Council Report 2018: Full Report

Welcome to the latest briefing from the Ipsos Reputation Council.

This – our thirteenth sitting – has been the biggest and most international yet, involving 154 senior communicators from 20 countries.

As Paul Polman, CEO of Unilever, once said: “reputation has a habit of arriving on foot and departing on horseback”. In the past year, a welter of high-profile reputation scandals affecting businesses, their leaders and even whole industry sectors has, once again, focused our minds on the risks and rewards of this powerful but potentially volatile asset.

Some of these scandals have posed a genuine threat to companies’ continued survival or licence to operate. Others have fizzled out. In this edition, we examine how Reputation Council members distinguish between issues which might blow up into a genuine reputation crisis, and others that are just day-to-day turbulence. What indicators or early warning systems can communicators draw on, to help them build resilience?

The technology sector has been wrestling with some unprecedented reputation issues recently. Concerns around privacy, data leaks, advertising practices, AI and automation have come together to create the phenomenon of ‘techlash’. We talk to Council members about the implications for their own businesses and the lessons that communicators can learn from the way in which the technology sector is responding to techlash.

We’re also beginning to see greater scrutiny of the role that CEOs should play in external communications, against a backdrop of issues such as pay ratio reporting, gender inequality, shrinking CEO tenures and the ‘celebrity leader’. In this edition, we explore Council members’ playbook for CEO-led communications, and look at how the CCO can ensure that these communications build, rather than destroy, reputation value.

The opportunities and challenges that come with communicating in a global context is a theme we’ve examined in past editions. In this sitting, we ask Council members how they strike the right balance between global and local messaging and narratives, and how they keep a finger on the pulse of their reputation (or reputations) around the world.

Lastly, we’ve introduced some new, ‘quickfire’ sections, in which we analyse Council members’ views on a number of contentious, topical talking points, such as the death of CSR, the distraction posed by social media, the need to pick a side in a polarising society, and whether consumers will overlook poor corporate behaviour if the price is right

I hope you enjoy this edition of the Reputation Council report. Please do get in touch if you’d like to find out more about any of the issues covered or discuss how they might affect your own business.

Milorad Ajder
Global Service Line Leader
Corporate Reputation
milorad.ajder@ipsos.com

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Global Perspectives on Sector Reputations

Which industries are facing the greatest reputation challenges at the moment?

NORTH AMERICA

Media: 44%

Tech: 44%

Pharma: 31%

Despite lingering reputational issues still plaguing the financial services sector, the recent assault on media and tech means that these two industries are seen to be facing the greatest reputational challenges in North America. Each of these industries is named by 44% of Council members.

Beyond these two industries, pharmaceuticals now holds the third position in terms of reputational challenges at 31%. Cost and value continue to drive the conversation, and with the US government putting more of a spotlight on drug costs, these reputational challenges are likely to continue.

"[Media has] got a constant drumbeat of ‘fake news’, how do you overcome that?"
"These are self-inflicted wounds [in the tech industry] – companies are not thinking through the implications of their actions on their customers."
LATIN AMERICA

Construction: 50%

Energy: 41%

Mining: 34%

In Latin America, construction rises to the top as the industry facing the greatest reputational challenges this year (50%). A number of corruption charges have embroiled not only specific companies throughout the region but also politicians and civil servants.

Energy (41%) and mining (34%) round out the top three most challenged industries, predominantly due to environmental concerns and a perception that they bring limited benefits to the local markets.

"There is a public perception that mining pollutes, does not produce profits for the country, and is a group of companies that do not add local value but add value to those who extract the material and take it away."
EUROPE

Finance: 44%

Energy: 43%

Finance remains one of the industries facing the greatest reputational challenge in Europe (mentioned by 44% of Council members). In the words of one Council member, “this crisis has not been solved yet, given that the image reconstruction process appears to be very slow.”

Additional challenges for the financial services sector include cyber security concerns and emerging FinTech players challenging the traditional financial companies.

Energy also continues to face reputational challenges, cited by 43% of Council members in Europe. Issues continue to focus on environmental concerns, climate change, sustainability and consumer costs.

"When energy companies don’t immediately pass on price savings from a barrel of oil to a consumer or to a client, then the negative repercussions are there immediately."
ASIA PACIFIC

Finance: 88%

Energy: 71%

Media: 71%

Consistent with last year, the financial services industry continues to suffer reputational challenges in APAC, though mentions are higher this year at 88% (up from 73% in the last wave). Council members continue to cite the lingering effects of the financial crisis.

The energy sector is also mentioned more frequently than last year (71%), and while affordability and sustainability are still key reasons, government policy is now referenced far more frequently by Council members.

This year, media is also mentioned by 65% of Council members in APAC, with many attributing this to a changing media landscape as well as the resounding cry of ‘fake news’.

"The energy policy is a mess. Can’t separate from political environment."
"The Trump phenomenon and the constant hammering of ‘fake news’."

In full: how Reputation Council members around the world perceived each sector's reputation

Methodology: 154 interviews conducted with Reputation Council members between 25th June and 12th November 2018. Base: All Reputation Council members – Global (145), North America (16), Europe (80), Latin America (32), APAC (17).

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